Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Three Dimensional Styrofoam Sculptures

At times it’s easy to think that you might not have the “right” art materials at school for the children to do some art work. But, that shouldn't stop you from allowing the children in experimenting with different materials. All you have to do is look inside your recycling bin. You will see a whole world of materials just waiting to be discovered and played with. As a strong believer of open–ended play it is imperative that children have the opportunities to let their minds wonder and have no specific plan to follow. Art experiences are not about: "Follow the directions, stick this on the circle and that on down there, now color it in with yellow only, and now doesn't that look nice?" Children should be encouraged to be thinkers and risk takers, not merely learn to follow directions























More than a week ago, for some strange reason my dad’s 20 year old television decided to stop talking. Yes, the picture was still clear but no sound could be heard not even a whisper. We decided to recycle the poor old bulky and super heavy television for a much slimmer model (lucky guy!). Of course we kept the box and Styrofoam cubes inside. Yahoo!!! A big box…. Yesterday, the children decided to work on more 3 dimensional Styrofoam sculptures, a project that they really enjoyed doing a few months ago. Styrofoam or scratch foam sheets may be expensive when purchased at craft or art supply stores, recycling and re- purposing them is the most economical way of using them.










When children represent their artwork into a three dimensional form, they invite us into their world and tell us a great deal about themselves. There are emotional meanings to the placements of each object. They respond to their space in a personal way, which naturally comes with creative & dramatic stories. By engaging in simple construction, children learn relationships and differences of various materials and are usually kept in their minds for future problem solving skills. Interesting effects can be made when interlocking materials. My children absolutely love it!




























2 comments:

  1. I just got a huge styrofoam donation and need to use it up. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  2. If you can come up with more ideas, please share. I still have a big bin full.

    Guess who's going rubber band hunting on Saturday? Senorita Maria!

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